Tested for

Perfection

Thomas Olczyk is working with Harder & Steenbeck Infinity +

Tested for

Perfection

Enrico Lein is working with Harder & Steenbeck Evolution twin action +

Tested for

Perfection

Younes Bouchlouch is working with Harder & Steenbeck Grafo +

Tested for

Perfection

Julia Stoess is working with Harder & Steenbeck Colani +

Tested for

Perfection

Angel Giraldez is working with Harder & Steenbeck Evolution ALplus +

Eagle and Dolphin

Eagle Step 1

For the eagle motif you will need the Eagle and Dolphin stencil plus pro-color paints black, white, yellow, umbra and ice blue. First spray your desired background. This may be a cloud landscape or simply a light blue gradient. Then apply the stencil's wing element and consistently spray over the area with black, ideally in the direction the feathers grow.

Step 2

Switch to the part of the stencil with the eagle's head and tail. Align them exactly to the part of the eagle already sprayed.

Step 3

Spray the exposed areas with opaque white. Apply a soft mist of white to the stencil's line cut-outs, for the wings' individual feather segments.

Step 4

Here you can see the intermediate results.

Step 5

Apply the part of the stencil with the head and tail again and add some shadings and structure to the head using umbra. You may also shape up the tail's feather structures with a loose curved stencil (e.g. from the Freehand Portrait stencil set). Apply the stencil and spray very small shadings with umbra. This way your tail feathers will look more fanned out and realistic.

Step 6

Here you can see the intermediate results of your motif again.

Step 7

For the next step, spray the beak using the stencil's beak element. First apply a white grounding, then a layer of light orange; after that you can implement the beak's curve with a darker shade of orange. Do the same with the eagle's claws. Take care to position them exactly where they need to be.

Step 8

You may indicate the feather structures on the spread wings, again with a curved stencil. First position the stencil, then spray along the edge very lightly. After that, move it and repeat to indicate the next feather. The feather segments already sprayed will help you align them. Since the feather segments are only supposed to be slightly visible, spray over the shadings and lines with a transparent black afterwards, in order to tone them down again.

Step 9

For the last step, spray the eye and the beak line. These details are part of the Eagle and Dolphin stencil as well. Use a fine brush in order to indicate some additional details to the feathers and to connect head and body as well as body and tail feathers.

Dolphin Step 1

For this dolphin illustration you will need the Eagle and Dolphin stencil, a couple of fine brushes and pro-color white, black, ice blue, umbra and citrus yellow. First, spray your desired background, e.g. a typical sky and sea scenery. You may add an island with beach and palm trees to the horizon, if you wish.

Step 2

Position the dolphin part of the stencil. You might want to fix the stencil with some weights.

Step 3

Spray over the whole area consistently with opaque white.

Step 4

After that use a mixture of blue and white in order to spray the first shadings. Start on the edge of the dolphin stencil and leave a few areas within the dolphin's body untouched to underline the shape. The shadings define the body's curve.

Step 5

Now mix some blue with some black and water in order to further refine the shading on the dolphin. Use another small stencil in order to separate the fluke from the body while spraying it a bit darker.

Step 6

Now apply the part of the stencil with the light reflections and spray a touch of white over it.

Step 7

In order to soften the hard edges of the reflections a bit, lightly spray over them with white.

Step 8

You may darken a few areas, e.g. on the bottom fin, the belly or the chin, using your transparent mixture of blue and black.

Step 9

The apply the stencil's eye and mouth and spray them out with black. Add a highlight to the eye using a fine brush and white. Using quivered lines on the water's surface and on the fins and fluke you can create splashes of water.